Have I Been Pwned PowerShell Module v3

Over the last few years I’ve written I few posts on a PowerShell module I created that allows users to directly talk to the Have I Been Pwned API service (https://haveibeenpwned.com) that Troy Hunt maintains. While those posts are a little old now, they are still a good read on what this PowerShell Module is about. I encourage you to read them if you are interested (links at the bottom).

A few months back Troy made a big change to the way his API service works by requiring authorisation in the form of an API key. This broke a lot of different scripts and services the community have created that leveraged his service, including my own PowerShell module. Troy has discussed at length why he has decided to take these steps. I won’t bother going into it here. Authentication and the Have I Been Pwned API

Shortly after this change took effect I received a number of comments from the community that my PowerShell module didn’t work anymore. One or two even said that it was failing because I wasn’t providing an API key with the module. So I wanted to spend a few minutes to explain some of the new changes in the way the latest version of the Have I Been Pwned PowerShell module works. And what you need to do if you want to use it.

Firstly I decided to version increment the PowerShell module from the previous latest version of v1.4.2 to v3 to match the API version used by HIBP. (Version 2 was a short lived version up on my GitHub page)

Now for the big breaking change. Where applicable, all the URIs in the module have been updated to the v3 API. And again, where applicable, have had a header added to them to include a hibp-api-key value/token. Not all URI endpoints require an API Key. Generally speaking if you want to check for a pwned email address you will need an API key.

So how does this work?
The two functions that require an API key to be specified are Get-PwnedAccount and Get-PwnedPasteAccount. In the past you would have typed something like --

Get-PwnedAccount -EmailAdddress [email protected]

This would have returned all breached instances of sites that this email address would have been compromised in. In version 3 you now require the use of an API key to do the same thing.

Get-PwnedAccount -EmailAdddress [email protected] -apiKey "hibp-api-key"

So in this above example you can input your API key directly in the command. Or you could store it in a variable and call it at a later stage in the command. For example

$myApiKey = "xxxxxxxxxxxxx"
Get-PwnedAccount -EmailAdddress [email protected] -apiKey $myApiKey 

If you also really wanted to, you could hard code your API key in the parameters section of these scripts. Certainly not recommended but the choice is yours.

So where do I get this API key?
To make it clear, not from this PowerShell module or from me. You will need to go to Troy Hunt’s site (https://haveibeenpwned.com/API/Key) and purchase one.

Once you do you, this will be yours, or your organisation’s, own personal key that you do not share out. How you protect it and how you want to use it will be up to you.

Where can I download the PowerShell Module?
PowerShellGallery: https://www.powershellgallery.com/packages/HaveIBeenPwned/
GitHub: https://github.com/originaluko/haveibeenpwned

Previous Posts
HaveIBeenPwned PowerShell Module
HaveIBeenPwned PowerShell Module Updates

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